This is old-school travel writing that requires, first and foremost, a writer.

But that’s commerce, and even commerce sometimes shrugs and lets a bit of art sneak by. In the Summer 2013 issue of Granta, the American novelist Teju Cole goes back to his home country of Nigeria and, in the fashion of Norman Lewis, stands back, breathes, watches and listens. He sees a man nearly drown trying to rescue his car from the incoming tide. He’s robbed at gunpoint, loses his laptop. It’s a quiet but tense story about violence that’s close enough to touch, but it’s also a story of Nigeria at its best: the music, the food, the talent for daily life under thunderclouds. There are no contrived Levels of Difficulty except those that emerge on their own, without the author’s help, and no major appliances are carried. This is old-school travel writing that requires, first and foremost, a writer.

via Modern travel, far from the madding crowdsourcing – The Globe and Mail.