The body has a dimension. Through motion it polarizes external reality and becomes our instrument of meaning; its experience is therefore “geo-metrical.”

The creation of order in a mutable and finite world is the ultimate purpose of man’s thought and actions. There was probably never human perception outside a framework of categories; the ideal and the real, the general and the specific, are “given” in perception, constituting the intentional realm that is the realm of existence. Perception is our primary form of knowing and does not exist apart from the a priori of the body’s structure and its engagement in the world. This “owned body,” as Merleau-Ponty would say, is the locus of all formulations about the world; it not only occupies space and time but consists of spatiality and temporality. The body has a dimension. Through motion it polarizes external reality and becomes our instrument of meaning; its experience is therefore “geo-metrical.” The extension of this “geometry of experience,” in Husserl’s phrase, beyond the body’s (and the mind’s) spatiality constitutes the thrust of architectural design, the creation of an order resonant with the body’s own.

From the introduction to ARCHITECTURE AND THE CRISIS OF MODERN SCIENCE, by Alberto Pérez Gómez