The Failure of Desegregation : something less tangible and far more durable…

The Supreme Court decision on Brown, in 1954, marked a moral high point in American history, but the practice that it dispatched to the graveyard had already begun to mutate into something less tangible and far more durable. What would, in the end, preserve the principle of “separate inequality” was not protests like the one staged by Orval Faubus, the governor of Arkansas, who blocked the doorway of Little Rock’s Central High School, in 1957, in order to keep black students out. Instead, it was policies like the National Highway Act, whose passage that same year helped spawn American suburbia. In the wake of Brown, private schools, whose implicit mission was to educate white children, cropped up throughout the South. The persistent legacies of redlining, housing discrimination, and wage disparity conspired to produce segregation without Jim Crow—maintaining all the familiar elements of the past in an updated operating system.

via The Failure of Desegregation : The New Yorker.