Archived entries for journey

Unknown Fields Division

The Unknown Fields Division is a nomadic design studio that ventures out on annual expeditions to the ends of the earth exploring unreal and forgotten landscapes, alien terrains and obsolete ecologies. Join the Division as each year we navigate a different global cross section and map the complex and contradictory realities of the present as a site of strange and extraordinary futures.
 
Here we are both visionaries and reporters, part documentarians and part science fiction soothsayers as the otherworldly sites we encounter afford us a distanced viewpoint from which to survey the consequences of emerging environmental and technological scenarios.

Unknown Fields Division.

This is old-school travel writing that requires, first and foremost, a writer.

But that’s commerce, and even commerce sometimes shrugs and lets a bit of art sneak by. In the Summer 2013 issue of Granta, the American novelist Teju Cole goes back to his home country of Nigeria and, in the fashion of Norman Lewis, stands back, breathes, watches and listens. He sees a man nearly drown trying to rescue his car from the incoming tide. He’s robbed at gunpoint, loses his laptop. It’s a quiet but tense story about violence that’s close enough to touch, but it’s also a story of Nigeria at its best: the music, the food, the talent for daily life under thunderclouds. There are no contrived Levels of Difficulty except those that emerge on their own, without the author’s help, and no major appliances are carried. This is old-school travel writing that requires, first and foremost, a writer.

via Modern travel, far from the madding crowdsourcing – The Globe and Mail.

Journey: …to make a pair of players connect, despite those limitations, and help each other move forward…

You play a faceless, cloaked figure who glides through a vast desert towards a mountain on the horizon. Along the way, you may encounter a second player, with an identical avatar, who is plucked from the Internet through an online matchmaking system. Both players remain anonymous—there are no usernames or other identifying details—and communication is limited to varying combinations of the same, one-note chirp. No words ever appear onscreen during gameplay. The idea of the two-hour game is to make a pair of players connect, despite those limitations, and help each other move forward. Along the way, they solve puzzles and explore the remnants of a forgotten civilization.

via A Journey to Make Video Games Into Art : The New Yorker.



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