Archived entries for ocean

La balsa de la Medusa

11 Raft_of_Méduse-Alexandre_Corréard-IMG_4788-cropped

[Estado de la embarcación en el momento del rescate. De la "Relation complète du naufrage de la frégate La Méduse faisant partie de l'expédition du Sénégal en 1816 par Alexandre Correard, H. Savigny, D'Anglas de Praviel et Paul C.L. Alexandre Rand des Adrets (dit Sander Rang)".]

conquérir un élément: la composition des rapports

“Au contraire, je sais nager : ça ne veut pas dire forcément que j’ai une connaissance mathématique ou physique, scientifique, du mouvement de la vague ; ça veut dire que j’ai un savoir faire, un savoir faire étonnant, c’est-à-dire que j’ai une espèce de sens du rythme, la rythmicité. Qu’est-ce que ça veut dire, le rythme ? ça veut dire que mes rapports caractéristiques je sais les composer directement avec les rapports de la vague. ça ne se passe plus entre la vague et moi, c’est-à-dire que ça ne se passe plus entre les parties extensives, les parties mouillées de la vague et les parties de mon corps ; ça se passe entre les rapports. Les rapports qui composent la vague, les rapports qui composent mon corps et mon habileté lorsque je sais nager, à présenter mon corps sous des rapports qui se composent directement avec le rapport de la vague. Je plonge au bon moment, je ressors au bon moment. J’évite la vague qui approche, ou, au contraire je m’en sers, etc… Tout cet art de la composition des rapports.”

via Les genres de connaissance,
extrait du cours de Gilles Deleuze sur Spinoza
.

Detail of the map Americae 1562 (the Americas) by Diego Gutiérrez and Hieronymus Cock (engraver) via LoC and Wikimedia, via Charting The Unknown « The Dish.

 

Our relation with the “known unknowns”

One of cartography’s most persistent myths: mapmakers of yore, frustrated by the world beyond their ken, marked the blank spaces on their maps with the legend Here be monsters.

It’s a pleasing hypothesis. For to label a cartographic vacuum with the stuff of nightmares solves two problems at once. It explains why the fringes of contemporary knowledge didn’t match the outer limits of the entire world – monsters were keeping us out! And, by being equal parts fantastic and horrific, those monsters symbolise our fascination with the known unknowns [1] just out of our reach. What keeps us out is also what draws us in.

via 600 – Münster’s Monster Mash | Strange Maps | Big Think.

Melville’s Voyages

melvilles_voyages

Map of Melville’s voyages and the voyage of the Pequod taken from the Norton Critical Edition of Moby-Dick, ed. by Hershel Parker and Harrison Hayford
via Moby-Dick Big Read, Day 44 | patell dot org.

Matthew Fontaine Maury’s Whale Chart

Whale Chart Maury

“This chart divides the ocean into districts of five degrees of latitude by five degrees of longitude; perpendicularly through each of which districts are three lines; one to show the number of days that have been spent in each month in every district, and the two others to show the number of days on which whales, sperm or right, have been seen.”

Herman Melville

while he himself was marking out lines and courses on the wrinkled charts, some invisible pencil was also tracing lines and courses upon the deeply marked chart of his forehead

Had you followed Captain Ahab down into his cabin after the squall that took place on the night succeeding that wild ratification of his purpose with his crew, you would have seen him go to a locker in the transom, and bringing out a large wrinkled roll of yellowish sea charts, spread them before him on his screwed-down table. Then seating himself before it, you would have seen him intently study the various lines and shadings which there met his eye; and with slow but steady pencil trace additional courses over spaces that before were blank. At intervals, he would refer to piles of old log-books beside him, wherein were set down the seasons and places in which, on various former voyages of various ships, Sperm Whales had been captured or seen.

While thus employed, the heavy pewter lamp suspended in chains over his head, continually rocked with the motion of the ship, and for ever threw shifting gleams and shadows of lines upon his wrinkled brow, till it almost seemed that while he himself was marking out lines and courses on the wrinkled charts, some invisible pencil was also tracing lines and courses upon the deeply marked chart of his forehead.

via Moby-Dick Big Read, Day 44 | patell dot org.

First attempt at a bathymetric map by Matthew Fontaine Maury

First attempt at a bathymetric map by Matthew Fontaine Maury. Showed vast relatively shoal area in Mid-Atlantic Grave. Source: In The Physical Geography of the Sea 1855 by M. F. Maury. Courtesy of NOAA Photo Library. Citation: In The Physical Geography of the Sea 1855 by M. F. Maury. Published by Harper and Brothers, New York. p. 209.

via NOAA Ocean Explorer: Bathymetric Map of Mid-Atlantic Region.



Copyright © 2004–2009. All rights reserved.

RSS Feed. This blog is proudly powered by Wordpress and uses Modern Clix, a theme by Rodrigo Galindez.