Archived entries for walter benjamin

Man in a Suitcase: Tulse Luper, Duchamp’s Boîte-en-valise, Benjamin’s suitcase and heterotopias

“As a symbol, then, the suitcase is double-edged, ambivalent in the extreme: on the one hand, it evokes travel, displacement, emigration, exile and transience; on the other, it is that part of home that travels with us, a reminder of belonging and stability, the world of things we collect around us, the promise of continuity in the midst of change, of order restored. The suitcase is a portable heterotopia, an ‘other space’ that is always there and here at the same time, a home away from home, but also offering the endless possibility of new departures, whether desired or forced. At Compton Verney, the suitcase has lost its traditional use value as a transporter of a selection of items – the tourist’s range of clothes, the travelling salesman’s range of wares – to take on other functions. By virtue of its plurality, it has become collective, is no longer the container of individual dreams or necessities, but an element in a collection that, as a whole, represents the century.”

Man in a Suitcase: Tulse Luper at Compton Verney by Bridget Elliott and Anthony Purdy.

no confundamos al flâneur con el mirón y a la multitud con la muchedumbre, cuestiones de individualidad…

“No confundamos al flâneur con el mirón: [...] el flâneur… está siempre en [...] posesión de su individualidad, mientras la del mirón desaparece, al contrario, al quedar absorbida por el mundo exterior [...] que lo hace exaltarse, embriagado, hasta el éxtasis. Bajo la presión del espectáculo el mirón se hace un ser impersonal; ya no es un hombre: es público, es decir, muchedumbre.”

Obra de los pasajes
Victor Fournel. Ce qu’on voit dans les rues de Paris, París 1858, p. 263. Cit. en Obra de los pasajes, M 6, 5

via Atlas Walter Benjamin – flâneur.

Like the castle in Kafka’s novel, which burdens the village with the obscurity of its decrees and the multiplicity of its offices, the accumulated culture has lost its living meaning and hangs over man like a threat in which he can in no way recognize himself

The interruption of tradition, which is for us now a fait accompli, opens an era in which no link is possible between old and new, if not the infinite accumulation of the old in a sort of monstrous archive or the alientation effected by the very means that is supposed to help with the transmissin of the old. Like the castle in Kafka’s novel, which burdens the village with the obscurity of its decrees and the multiplicity of its offices, the accumulated culture has lost its living meaning and hangs over man like a threat in which he can in no way recognize himself. Suspended in the void between old and new, past and future, man is projected into time as into somethin alien that incessantly elludes him and still drags him forward, but without allowing him to find his ground in it.

      Giorgio Agamben, The Man Wiithout Content, translated by Georgia Albert

via ::: wood s lot ::: "the fitful tracing of a portal".



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