Archived entries for warren h manning

On the racial zoning system in Birmingham & Warren Manning

“The 1920s brought continued efforts to fashion a legally defensible racial zoning system in tandem with comprehensive city planning. Also, race-based planning spread into new places. Birmingham, Alabama, was one of the new converts to racial zoning as well as the broader version of race-based planning. Although the city lacked an official planning body, it hired Warren Manning, a Boston landscape architect, as its planning consultant and released the “City Plan of Birmingham” in 1919. The Manning plan offered a series of general recommendations about land use, transportation, and civic improvements for a city that during the previous decade increased its land area sevenfold and its population by 150,000 persons.”

From THE RACIAL ORIGINS OF ZONING IN AMERICAN CITIES by Christopher Silver in Urban planning and the African American community: in the shadows

a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources”

In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.

via Warren H. Manning – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.



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